Monday, October 11, 2010

Victorian Texting Lingo?



These days, texting lingo has dramatically grown into a universal language. Whether you text or not, you can figure out that “I heard that 1 from U B4” means “I heard that one from you before.” This message looks like a typical text message from a teenager but actually, this type of abbreviated and acronym-filled language was used about 130 years by Victorian writers. In London, an exhibit displays an emblematic poem from 1867 that demonstrates the use of textspeak. Charles Carroll Bombaugh wrote the poem, entitling it Gleanings From the Harvest-Fields of Literature, and in it did it include verses as simple as “he says he love U2” or as complicated as “And 1st should NE NVU, B EZ, mind it not,” which translates to “And first should any envy you, be easy, mind it not.” According to David Crystal, author or Txtng: The Gr8 Db8 [“Texting: The Great Debate”], certain phrases have been around so long that the what seemed so foreign mobile language is not so alien after all. IOU [“I owe you”] has been around since 1618 and SWALK [“sealed with a loving kiss”] has been seen in the letters from World War II. So, next time your teacher calls you out for abbreviations or acronyms on your assignments, put the blame on the Victorian Era writers who started it all. TTFN.


Charisse P.

Period 7


http://news.discovery.com/history/victorian-poets-used-texting-lingo.html?print=true

18 comments:

Devin M. said...

I guess I could see that happening it's not crazy. but now I have an excuse to my parents when I write notes like that...even acient scholars and writers did it

shannon said...

Wow that is truly interesting! I had no idea the texting language, so to speak, has been around so long. I guess history has a way of repeating itself.

shannon said...

Wow that is truly fascinating! I had no idea the texting language, so to speak, was created by the Victorians. It's odd because we often associate "old" people or generations as being behind the times, but in this case, they were about 130 years ahead of us! I guess history has a way of repeating itself.

Megan Opfer said...

I guess what they say about history repeating itself is true! It's fascinating to think that even after a hundred years styles and mannerisms can resurface and become popular once more. Now, every time I text I find myself wondering what it would be like to write the same way in Victorian society and still have my words understood.

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn how abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. It was interesting how the people of the Victorian Era used abbreviations for common sayings which is similar to how we also use abbreviations for our own common sayings. I thought it was also interesting how the people of the Victorian Era and the Modern Day Era share some of the same abbreviations, such as "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Eveline Gibson said...

This article was very interesting to read. It was fascinating to learn that abbreviations have been used for hundreds of years. I thought it was interesting that the people of the Victorian Era used common abbreviations for sayings much like how we use common abbreviations for our own sayings. It was also interesting to learn that the people of the Victorian Era share some common abbreviations with the people of the Modern Day Era, such as the phrase "IOU" (I owe you).

Maryssa said...

This article was so easy to relate to simply because it was about texting! I don't really find history as my favorite subject but this article made me appreciate it a little more. To know that something I do everyday has been around for hundreds of years is fascinating. Today I even take texting for granted, but now i know it was used during the Victorian Era.

Elizabeth said...

I did not know that the texting abbreviations came from ancient scholars. I also though that it came around a lot later.

Elizabeth said...

I did not know that texting abbreviations came from ancient scholars. I thought that it came around a lot later.

Liam S. said...

I never would have guessed the origins of our modern day "texting language" could go back as far as Victorian England. It amazes me to think, a time period I have always viewed as so fine and proper could be the source of what many adults today find immature and an improper way to write.

Summer said...

I think this is cool! Teenagers finally have an excuse. It's interesting that all these phrases were made up during the Victorian era, the British knew what was up!