Sunday, December 5, 2010

Did the Maya Build Chirping Pyramids?


Since 1998, scientists have been recording chirp-like echoes inside of Mayan pyramids, such as Kukulkan. The scientists have concluded that the chirping is more than a strange coincidence, but an intentional element of the design of the pyramids. Researchers have found that the chirping noise resembles the call of the quetzal, the messenger to the Mayan gods, and believe that whenever one clapped inside of the temple they would be rewarded with this sacred call.

But what exactly makes these large temples like Kukulkan chirp? Researchers have found that Kukulkan had four sets of stairways with 91 stairs each, plus one step at the top, adding up to 365 steps. Scientists think that when a person clapped, the noise bounced off the many stairs present in the temples and declined in frequency, making the chirp-like noise. The Mayans most likely discovered this phenomenon by accident, but after years of improvements, eventually made it a more accurate representation of the quetzal call.

http://www.history.com/topics/maya-pyramid-acoustics

Jessica M Period 7

3 comments:

Taylor said...

This is very interesting that the Maya were able to create their pyramids in such a way that they were able to make sounds of quetzal. It is also fascinating that the pyramids steps add up to 365 that seems to correspond with the days of the year.

Taylor said...

This is very interesting that the Maya were able to create their pyramids in such a way that they were able to make sounds of quetzal. It is also fascinating that the pyramids steps add up to 365 that seems to correspond with the days of the year.

Logan Ahlf said...

It's quite a coincidence that the sound of the messenegers of the Mayan gods "accidently" occured in the temples to those same gods, and that the Mayans recognized and recreated the sound.